Duck into Third Grade

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Who IS Doing the Work? Scaffolding vs Carrying

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Teachers tend to talk and talk and talk. Why? We know we can’t learn anything by talking. What should we be doing? LISTENING! Step back and listen…listen to your kids intently and get ready to learn LOTS of things.

Hector was a shy little guy that taught me it was okay to read tough books. Somehow he managed to plod through all of Avi’s Poppy series only because his desire was on fire. I wanted to suggest an easier read but he was in love with Poppy and he would have no substitutes. I was blessed to watch him evolve as a reader. Thank you, Hector, because of you, I will let my students grapple with texts they are passionate about.

Mandy was a struggling disinterested reader until she got hooked on Cam Jansen mysteries which jump started her reading! She taught me that it was possible to be a lopsided genre reader and still get advanced on the state assessment! She had been filling in her genre boxes at a snail’s pace but Can Jansen saved the day! Thank you, Mandy, because of you, I will let kids explode the genre box of their choice, an expert is a good thing to be.

Andrew was a voracious reader but he read easy texts and never pushed himself. He loved reading but he was a pajama reader, comfortable was his code. He taught me if a reader is reading, let them read. Was it easy, NO! Did I introduce many various texts in class, YES! Thank you, Andrew, for reminding me that choice is vital! Extremely tough lesson for this teacher to learn.

Burkins and Yaris have written a fantastic book! They remind teachers that there is a big difference between scaffolding and carrying students. Carrying is often done by conscientious educators every day when we do so much prompting and reminding students don’t even have to think. The result is learned helplessness, which does not help prepare kids for the real world. A talented cook adds just enough salt to make a tasty dish, we need to give just the right nudge to inspire our students toward success. We must let learners do the work because we do not want to deprive any student the joy that comes from learning something new. Burkins and Yaris call this the Grandmother method, “Wow! How did you do that?” followed by “What will you do next?”

Knock Knock My Dad’s Dream for Me by Daniel Beaty is a mentor text that illustrates why we don’t want to do too much for our kids. This is a beautiful story about a boy struggling to deal with his father’s absence. He doesn’t give up even though times are tough. The author’s note is powerful! Kids must be problem solvers in life, literature provides a safe place to practice!

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