Duck into Third Grade

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Practicing Predicting with PURPOSE

How important is it to teach kids to be predictors? Adults often forget that predicting takes time.  It comes more naturally for some students than others.  It is definitely a learned skill that improves with practice. Summer is a time to s-l-o-w down and  b-r-e-a-t-h-e!  Look for examples to try out and teach predicting to those fortunate folks in your nucleus.

I wonder if those are rain clouds because they are…

I think this movie will be good/bad because…

This character is very determined so I predict he will …

If I don’t double check my packing I will probably…

The dry weather is tough on flowers, if I don’t water them they will …

Speaking of flowers, I discovered this red balloon wrapped around my rose bush, I had to do a double take.  It made me smile to think I actually thought it was a flower at first glance. Double takes are vital in life and in the classroom.

Teaching kids to have a second look and giving them time to reflect and check their predictions is huge:

Was I right on the money?

Do I need to tweak my predictions?

Do I need to do a 180 and rethink?

Isn’t this a life skill needed by all?  Practice doesn’t make perfect, it makes permanent.

Summer is the perfect time to practice predicting with pizazz!

 


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Grit Gives Gusto

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How does a book about Grit, a little 6 year old girl and Close Reading paired passages connect?  Each paints a picture of doing something again and yet again. Duckworth’s book expresses that grit is more about stamina than intensity. Her research suggests that early strugglers have more stamina and patience. She even has a grit test which I’m sure Milly-Molly-Mandy would score up there with the paragons of grit that Duckworth has been studying. What are the common threads found in the grit gurus?
1. intrinsic interest in what they do (natural or developed)
2. daily discipline of practicing to get better
3. purpose-their work matters to them and to others
4. hope-they keep going even when things are difficult
She quotes a kid that made a D on a math test that exemplifies hope, “I didn’t dwell on it-it was done-I had to focus on what to do next. I asked for help and tried to figure out what I did wrong and what I needed to do differently.” Powerful advice!

Milly Molly Mandy’s quote is adorable because she has learned a lot about grit at a very young age. In this simple story book which is almost 90 years old she sees her friend Billy Blunt grumbling while he weeded his mother’s flowerbed. “Father says I ought to make myself useful,” he grunts.
Milly-Molly-Mandy replies, “That’s our sort of fruit. My Muvver says we’d be like apple trees which didn’t grow apples if we didn’t be useful.” Isn’t she adorable? She opens Billy’s eyes and totally changes the way he looks at his task. Her parents have done their job well.
My favorite quote from her mother was advice to a solemn Milly-Molly-Mandy, “There are nice things happening all the time, if you keep your eyes open to see them.”

Paired Passages by Timothy Rasinski and Lori Oczkus goes right along with developing grit. Their book uses Reciprocal Teaching or the ‘Fab Four’  to push student thinking. Research has found that students engaging in reciprocal teaching show improvement in as little as 15 days by eagerly engaging in discussions. The Fab Four… predict, clarify, question, and summarize are some gritty strategies indeed. Students read and reread the short fiction and nonfiction texts and practice with purpose!

I must send out a huge thank you to my students and parents that gave gift cards because that is what I used to purchase these little jewels! A book is a gift you can open again and again!

I’m off to work on improving my grit score as 2016 is in its eleventh hour and 2017 eagerly awaits to take the helm please join me on the journey!